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Life & Style
Nov 29 2012 12:59PM
 
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A new study conducted by scientists at the University of Oxford revealed that a high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) used in certain foods by manufacturers could be blamed for diabetes rates.

Led by Professor Stanley Ulijaszek the study showed that countries that HFCS were likely to have higher rates of diabetes when compare to those that consume little.

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) also called glucose-fructose syrup comprises any of a group of corn syrups that has undergone enzymatic processing to convert some of its glucose into fructose to produce a desired sweetness.

Consumer foods and products typically use high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener and it has become very common in processed foods and beverages in the U.S., including breads, cereals, breakfast bars, lunch meats, yogurts, soups, and condiments, this according to Wikipedia.org.

“This research suggests that HFCS can increase the risk of type-2 diabetes, which is one of the most common causes of death in the world today,” Professor Ulijaszek, from Oxford University, told Daily Mail Online.

Among 42 countries studied, rates of diabetes were 8 per cent in high-consuming nations and 6.7 among low consumers, the Daily Mail Online reported.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there are 347 million people worldwide living with diabetes.

On its website WHO wrote that it aims to stimulate and support the adoption of effective measures for the surveillance, prevention and control of diabetes and its complications, particularly in low and middle-income countries.

According to the research out of all countries studied US, came number one in terms of the HFCS consumption followed by Canada, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Belgium, Argentina, Korea, Japan and Mexico.

However, the study found that countries like Australia, China, Denmark, France, India, Ireland, Italy, Sweden and Uruguay consumed low in HFCS.

“Although this syrup can be found in many of our processed foods and drinks, this varies enormously from country to country. You would have to eat very many biscuits to get high fructose levels into your system.’ He said the UK had relatively high diabetes rates and was a high consumer of total sugar at almost 40kilos per person per year,” Professor Ulijaszek said.

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